Turkey Visa For The Bangladesh, South African, Bhutan, Cambodia and Iraq Citizens

Turkey Visa for South African Citizens
In 2013, the eVisa program was launched by the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, enabling citizens of more than 100 countries, such as South Africa, to request a Turkish visa through the internet. Therefore, South African tourists favor Turkey as a destination. South African citizens are no longer required to visit the Turkish embassy in person as they can now conveniently apply for their e-visa online. This effective process ensures a faster turnaround for receiving the e-visa. South Africans are required to apply for a Turkey e-Visa prior to their visit for purposes such as tourism, business, transit, or medical reasons. The e-Visa for Turkey available to South Africans allows for multiple entries and stays of up to 30 days. The Turkey e-Visa remains valid for 180 days starting from the issuance date. South African tourists can enter Turkey multiple times, with each visit lasting up to 90 days. This Turkey e-Visa has been launched to allow visitors to easily obtain their visas online. The process is faster and more convenient than applying for a traditional visa. This can be done in minutes from your home or office without having to visit the local Turkish Embassy or Consulate.
DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR CITIZENS OF SOUTH AFRICA
•    Passport – getting a South African passport is quite easy these days, so you should be able to get one fast. Make sure that it is valid for at least 6 months from the date you plan to enter this country.
•    Email address – your Turkey e-Visa will be linked to your passport electronically, but you still need a copy to show at the immigration office in Turkey. Make sure that you provide a valid address.
•    Means of payment – You can use a credit or a debit card to pay for the eVisa fees.

Turkey Visa for Bangladesh Citizens
Starting from 2013, the introduction of the Turkey e-Visa, a digital authorization platform, has simplified the process of entry into Turkey for tourists from over 100 nations. Bangladeshi residents are now able to apply for Turkish visas online. The e-Visa permits citizens of Bangladesh to visit Turkey for both leisure and business purposes. Individuals with a tourist visa can stay for 30 days with a single entry. It’s important to realize that the Turkish e-Visa remains valid for 180 days from the date of entry. However, a distinct Turkish visa is required for longer stays or other purposes. Fortunately, Bangladeshis are exempt from the requirement of scheduling an appointment in person at an embassy or consulate, thanks to the convenience of this online visa system. Travelers can apply for Turkey visa from Bangladesh in minutes with the simple electronic system. It can be applied for quickly and easily online.
TURKEY VISA REQUIREMENTS FOR BANGLADESH CITIZENS
•    A Valid passport with at least six months of validation.
•    A valid e-mail address to receive the E-Visa in their Inbox.
•    You can use a credit/debit card to pay for the e-visa fees.
•    Other requirements that you will need are a return ticket, a hotel reservation, and financial support for your trip.
Turkey Visa for Bhutan Citizens
People from Bhutan need to get a visa to travel to Turkey because Bhutan is not included in Turkey’s list of countries that do not require a visa. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Turkey introduced the eVisa program in 2013, allowing travelers to conveniently apply for their visas prior to their trip. The Turkish government has made it easier for travelers from Bhutan and over 100 other eligible countries to get a e-Visa. Getting an e-visa is an uncomplicated and automated procedure that adheres to the current policies and guidelines. The primary aim of the Turkey e-Visa was to simplify the online visa application process for tourists. Individuals from Bhutan are required to get a Turkey e-Visa if they are traveling to Turkey for tourism, business, transit, or medical purposes. With this e-Visa, Bhutanese individuals can enter Turkey once and stay for a maximum duration of 30 days. The Turkish e-Visa for Bhutanese Citizens is valid for 180 days from the date of entry, therefore Bhutanese visitors are required to enter Turkey during this period. Getting a visit visa to Turkey is quick and simple. Bhutanese applicants can apply for a Turkey visa online and complete it in minutes.
Requirements of Turkey Visa for Bhutanese citizens
•    A valid travel document or passport in order to apply for Turkey eVisa.
•    You can use a credit or debit card or PayPal account to pay for the Turkey Visa Online.
•    A valid email address, to receive the Turkey eVisa in their inbox.
Turkey Visa for Cambodia Citizens
Turkey is well-known for its abundant cultural heritage and generosity. Cambodian residents can now utilize an efficient electronic system to apply for a Turkey visa online, enabling them to complete the process in a matter of minutes. The Turkish e-Visa has replaced the traditional “sticker visa” to expedite the visa application process, providing a time-saving solution for travelers upon arrival in Turkey. The Turkish government has simplified the process for obtaining an e-Visa for travelers from Cambodia and more than 100 other qualifying countries. The online visa for Turkey, which was first launched in 2013, permits either one entry or multiple entries, with durations of either 30 or 90 days based on the passport holder’s nationality. Citizens of Cambodia must obtain a Turkey e-Visa to enter the country for purposes like tourism, business, transit, or medical visits. Turkey e-Visa is generally valid for 180 days from the date of issue. Cambodian citizens can apply for a traditional long-stay visa in Turkey or for other reasons at the Turkish Embassy in Cambodia or abroad. The Turkish e-Visa for Cambodians simplifies the application process and eliminates the need to visit an embassy or consulate in person. Cambodian travelers can apply for their visa in minutes by filling out a simple online form.
Requirements of Turkey Visa for Cambodian citizens
•    A valid travel document or passport in order to apply for Turkey eVisa.
•    A valid credit or debit card or PayPal account to pay for the Turkey Visa Online.
•    A valid email address, to receive the Turkey eVisa in their inbox.
Turkey Visa for Iraq Citizens
Turkey, being a popular destination for tourists globally, mandates that Iraqis must acquire a visa for entry. Turkey has broadened its options by introducing an electronic visa system, aiming to appeal to a wider range of tourists from various countries. In 2013, the Turkey e-Visa program was initiated by the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The process for getting an e-Visa for travelers from Iraq has been made easier by the Turkish government, along with over 100 other eligible countries. This program allows Iraqis to enter Turkey with the Turkey e-Visa, which permits them to stay for up to 30 days for either leisure or business reasons. The primary goal of implementing the Turkey e-Visa was to simplify the process of applying for visas on the internet. It should be pointed out that the Turkey e-Visa is only valid for one entry. For visits exceeding one month or for alternative purposes, a different type of Turkish visa is mandatory. The visa is valid for 180 days and the validity date is calculated based on the expected travel date provided by the applicant on the visa form. Iraqis who meet Turkey’s eVisa requirements can obtain authorization online instead of at a Turkish embassy or consulate. Travelers can apply in just a few minutes through the simple electronic system.
DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR CITIZENS OF IRAQ
•    Passport – getting an Iraqi passport is quite easy, so you should be able to get one quick. If you have one, make sure that it is valid and remains as such for the duration of your trip.
•    Email address – your Turkey e-Visa will be linked to your passport electronically, but you still need a copy to show at the immigration office in Turkey. You will receive your copy via email. Make sure that you provide a valid address.
•    Means of payment – You can use a credit or debit card. Moreover, if you have a PayPal account as many people do, you can use that as well.
Turkey Visa for South African Citizens
In 2013, the eVisa program was launched by the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, enabling citizens of more than 100 countries, such as South Africa, to request a Turkish visa through the internet. Therefore, South African tourists favor Turkey as a destination. South African citizens are no longer required to visit the Turkish embassy in person as they can now conveniently apply for their e-visa online. This effective process ensures a faster turnaround for receiving the e-visa. South Africans are required to apply for a Turkey e-Visa prior to their visit for purposes such as tourism, business, transit, or medical reasons. The e-Visa for Turkey available to South Africans allows for multiple entries and stays of up to 30 days. The Turkey e-Visa remains valid for 180 days starting from the issuance date. South African tourists can enter Turkey multiple times, with each visit lasting up to 90 days. This Turkey e-Visa has been launched to allow visitors to easily obtain their visas online. The process is faster and more convenient than applying for a traditional visa. This can be done in minutes from your home or office without having to visit the local Turkish Embassy or Consulate.
DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR CITIZENS OF SOUTH AFRICA
•    Passport – getting a South African passport is quite easy these days, so you should be able to get one fast. Make sure that it is valid for at least 6 months from the date you plan to enter this country.
•    Email address – your Turkey e-Visa will be linked to your passport electronically, but you still need a copy to show at the immigration office in Turkey. Make sure that you provide a valid address.
•    Means of payment – You can use a credit or a debit card to pay for the eVisa fees.


Australia court dismisses Iranian asylum seeker’s plea and orders return

 The Australian High Court passed a judgement on Friday that dismissed an Iranian asylum seeker’s plea to be released from immigration detention and enter the country. The Iranian asylum seeker, applicant ASF-17, applied to the Federal Court of Australia for a writ of habeas corpus in 2023 on the basis that his continuing detention exceeded the constitutional limitation identified in the orders of NZYQ v Minister for Immigration, Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs released the week prior. The applicant has been refusing to cooperate with the process of being removed from Australia to Iran since 2018, arguing that he would be at risk of persecution for his sexual orientation and religious beliefs. The applicant arrived unlawfully in Australia in 2013 and applied for a Safe Haven Enterprise Visa (SHEV) in 2015. However, his application was refused and rejected again by a delegate of the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection in 2017. His final determination by the Australian Federal Court rejected his application in 2018. This authorised the Department of Home Affairs to remove the applicant from Australia under section 198(6) of the Migration Act 1958 (Cth). The applicant was unable to identify any other country where he might be able to stay in the long term. The Department documented his stance as “intractable,” in 2022, describing the difficulty and only option was to deport him to Iran, where he was a citizen. The court noted that the Department has a policy of not removing anyone to a country in respect of which they have no right of residency or long-term stay “the third country removal policy.” Accordingly, the court also noted the difficulty in Iranian citizens gaining entry into the country as they cannot enter without a travel document issued by Iranian authorities. However, Iranian authorities have a longstanding policy of not issuing travel documents to involuntary returnees. The High Court ruled that the applicant’s case was different from the NZYQ case, reasoning that his continued detention was the result of his own decision not to cooperate in his deportation. For Australia to permissibly remove a detainee from the country, the court determines “whether the country has taken practically available steps which can realistically be predicted to result in the removal of the detainee in the reasonably foreseeable future.” Practically available steps include “administrative processes directed to removal which require the cooperation of the detainee and in which the detainee has the capacity to cooperate.” The applicant’s refusal to cooperate does not undermine the practical availability of the steps. Additionally, it was ruled there was no real threat to his safety. Even though the applicant was bisexual, the primary judge held that the applicant’s claim of fear of persecution based on his sexuality was the consequence of him being caught by his wife in bed with another man, and rejected his claim accordingly.

Corrupt Home Affairs officials are ‘selling SA to foreign nationals’ Those who bear the brunt of the corruption are mostly drug addicts, whose personal information is used by Home Affairs officials to create fake IDs and passports for foreigners.


 Home Affairs officials are “selling South Africa to foreign nationals” out of greed, says Minister Aaron Motsoaledi. In an exclusive interview with The Witness on Thursday, Motsoaledi said 182 department officials were dismissed for fraud and corruption between 2018 and 2024. Among those dismissed was a chief director who was implicated in assisting a foreign national in getting a permanent residence permit in the country, at a fee. Those who bear the brunt of the corruption are mostly drug addicts, whose personal information is used by Home Affairs officials to create fake IDs and passports for foreigners. Motsoaledi was commenting on the recent arrest of a Pietermaritzburg department employee by the Hawks for allegedly selling passports to foreigners. The man, according to Hawks provincial spokesperson Simphiwe Mhlongo, has since appeared at the Durban Commercial Crimes Court and was remanded in custody until Monday. Selling identity documents and passports is quite big in SA because the country is in demand. Many people around the world want to come to SA. They are prepared to pay money to get those documents. Even rich foreign people from unstable countries are prepared to get citizenship illegally. To mitigate the problem, Motsoaledi said the department has a counter corruption unit, which is headed by the department’s deputy director general. The unit comprises, among others, officers who have worked for the Hawks and are employed for their experience. “If they have 10 foreigners, these crooked officials will round up 10 SA nyaope (drug) addicts and go to a Home Affairs office at night, depending on the area they are based in, and process the documents. “Every detail of the addict will be accessed and when it comes to the photo, the foreign national will be the one who poses for the photo and in that manner, the SA citizen has lost his identity to the foreigner. This damages our citizens’ livelihoods because at a later stage the locals will realise that they do not exist in our system. Their names are there, but a different person has taken the identity. He said this was a lucrative business for unscrupulous employees, as among those who were dismissed were post-level 6 employees. “They perform clerical tasks but they own more than one luxury vehicle and you ask yourself: where do they get the money to afford such a wealthy lifestyle? It’s through selling their country to foreigners. We are clamping down on them and we have pending court cases and disciplinary proceedings,” Motsoaledi said. The Witness reported last month that a multi-disciplinary task team comprising the Mountain Rise police station, a community policing forum, a security company, and immigration officers swooped on a flat in Raisethorpe, where a sophisticated syndicate of undocumented immigrants was arrested. The syndicate was illegally producing fake identity documents, bank and fuel cards, passports and driving licences. While conducting a search of the flat after arresting the undocumented immigrants, officers discovered a locked room that contained about 300 bank cards from various financial institutions, 20 cellphones that were used to transact from some of those bank accounts, printing equipment commonly used for forgery, and fraudulent driving licences, identity documents, visas, and passports. Opposition parties in parliament were scathing of the department’s system. DA Shadow Minister of Home Affairs and parliamentarian, Angel Khanyile said the greed displayed by some Home Affairs officials was equivalent to selling the country to foreigners. This removes SA citizens from the national population register and also erases fingerprints, which results in locals being declared non-existent in the system. “Dismissing rogue elements is not enough because it’s a long process before the victims get their documents back. Since department employees use biometric systems to access information from computers, it therefore should be easy to catch the corrupt individuals.” IFP’s Liezl Van Der Merwe said the department was riddled with corruption, infiltrated by syndicates, and that the immigration system had collapsed. Our position with regards to the immigration crisis is that all foreign nationals who have South African documents, whether IDs, passports or permits, should have these revalidated. “Our manifesto proposes a six-month amnesty period wherein all foreign nationals should come forward to revalidate their permits and regularise their stay. This will allow us to root out all fake documentation or documentation obtained fraudulently,” said Van Der Merwe.

Blocking people from jobs based on criminal records in South Africa, what bosses should know


Recently settled case in the Labour Court demonstrated that excluding a job applicant because of their criminal record is only lawful when the requirements of that job explicitly outline and justify the need for a clean criminal record.


However, legal experts say that the court’s decision ultimately delinked trust and honesty from the inherent requirements of a job, which was “concerning.”


ENS Africa’s Nils Braatvedt, Kim Vova, and Lutho Zono examined the background, outcome, and subsequent analysis of the recent court ruling in O’Connor v LexisNexis.


The experts said that “this decision emphasises the risk of automatically excluding applicants from employment based on an inherent trait such as a criminal record.”


Background


O’Connor [first name omitted] applied for a senior data expert role at LexisNexis. As part of the recruitment process, the company required applicants to declare whether they had ever been criminally charged.


Acknowledging his past theft conviction from 2001 had been expunged, O’Connor was initially offered a job by LexisNexis based on the outcome of a background check.


LexisNexis withdrew their job offer following the check, which unveiled six theft charges, one fraud charge, and two charges of obstructing justice.


Aggrieved at this decision and after unsuccessfully attempting to settle the dispute at the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA), O’Connor approached the Labour Court.


He alleged that LexisNexis unfairly discriminated against him based on his past criminal convictions, basing the argument on a section of the Employment Equity Act that prohibits “unfair discrimination” in any employment policy or practice.


Court ruling


In considering whether O’Connor had been unfairly discriminated against, the court assessed whether the differentiation based on a criminal record was ” arbitrary.”


The court found that having a criminal record is an inherent attribute that is connected to how a person is viewed in society. Additionally, the court said that the idea behind criminal justice in South Africa is that once a criminal have paid their debt to society, that person must be allowed back into society.


“Accordingly, the Labour Court found that differentiation on the basis of a criminal record is an arbitrary ground as contemplated in section 6 of the EEA,” said Braatvedt, Vova, and Zono.


Additionally, the court had to ascertain whether discrimination was justifiable on the basis that it was an inherent requirement of the job for O’Connor to have a clean criminal record.


The court reached the conclusion that the position did “not require a significant amount of trust and honesty”, where the possibility of O’Connor’s rehabilitation should be completely disregarded.


It, therefore, found that LexisNexis did not demonstrate that a clean criminal record was an inherent requirement for the role and ordered that it would be just and equitable for LexisNexis to employ Mr O’Connor in the role.  


Legal Commentary


“What is perhaps concerning about the Court’s decision is the delinking of trust and honesty from the inherent requirements of a job,” said the ENS experts.


The ultimate decision was influenced by LexisNexis’ inadequate response to the claim’s core issues, with the court suggesting a different outcome had they engaged with the allegations.


However, the legal experts said that “the decision seems to contradict the common law principle that there is a reciprocal duty of good faith which obliges an employee to perform work in a trustworthy and honest manner indeed, trust underpins the employment relationship.”


“Insofar as the Court found that Mr O’Connor’s role did not require a significant amount of trust, there is either trust, or there is not an employer cannot be expected to tolerate a degree of untrustworthiness or dishonesty regardless of how clerical or geographically distinct an employee’s work may be,” they added.


The ENS experts said that, in their view, the enquiry should have started with the assumption that trust and honesty are essential for any job, and the key question should have rather been how a 20-year-old criminal conviction affects an employer’s trust in the applicant.


Things to note going forward


“Employers should bear in mind that excluding an applicant because of their criminal record is only lawful when the inherent requirements of the job legitimately require a clean criminal record,” said the experts.


A noteworthy part of this case involves O’Connor’s upfront disclosure of his criminal history, showing “a degree of honesty” despite potential employment consequences.


“Employees who refuse to disclose their criminal convictions when they have been asked to do so could be guilty of misconduct,” said Braatvedt, Vova, and Zono.

CoCT urges clarity on remote work visas amid system crisis


The City of Cape Town has slammed the Department of Home Affairs for creating confusion and continuing to score “infuriating” own goals in launching remote work visas in the country.

Mayoral committee member for economic growth, James Vos, said that the last month has seen the department shoot itself in the foot with the premature gazetting and subsequent withdrawal of regulations that would create this category of visa.

“On 28 March, the DHA published the amended immigration regulations. This, however, was a day before the closing date of the public comment period. And then, on 12 April, the minister issued a notice withdrawing the 28 March amendments,” Vos said.

Among other things, the regulations replaced the highly-contested critical skills list with a new points-based system and introduced the remote work visa class. At the time of the withdrawal, the minister said that the regulations would be revised within a week, but has since fallen silent.

“South Africa’s visa system is already infamously a mess and this latest bungle only serves as a reminder of the murk. The hundreds of thousands of employees working in the tourism industry, not to mention those in need of jobs, can ill afford yet more chaos caused by the department.”

Vos said that the tourism industry and businesses need urgent clarity on the status of the remote-worker visas. The delays could cost the country millions of rands of additional tourist spend.

“Businesses in countless more industries are equally frustrated as the skilled staff they need are unable to get into the country due to unprocessed visas,” he said.

The MEC said that businesses in industries like business process outsourcing have complained about the current visa system hindering expansion and skills transfer, while others have flagged challenges acquiring visas for delegates, forcing the relocation of conferences and events to other parts of Africa.

Vos urged the department to provide a detailed plan to address the crisis of the visa system and adhere to that plan.

Cape Town has been a major proponent of the remote-work visa, saying that it is in a prime position to benefit economically.

“A fully functioning visa system would be a boon to our country’s economy, driving investments and jobs for millions of desperate South Africans. I urge President Cyril Ramaphosa to exert pressure on the department to get this done,” he said.